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Aikido

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Re: Aikido

Postby Late Starter » Sun Feb 02, 2014 7:03 pm

Well, funny how things come round in circles. I spent all the lessons last week teaching students how to lift their partners hand without trying to push it upwards, which always leads to a clash and a stalled exercise. The way it works is that you think down and point downwards at the same time. Just point, don't reach or lean or force it. Just point and say silently to yourself DOWN! Then you just follow your partners reaction. If you feel your partner starting to pull upwards, you are resisting your partner. If your feel yourself pushing up against your partner, you are forcing the movement. You must move with your partner, so that neither you nor your partner can feel the other's movement. After about 3 hours of teaching we were getting some glimpses of success. I regarded that as excellent progress for a subtle and slippery concept.
Thursday night I had a lesson on Fizz. We were doing a bit of jumping, working up to a one stride double followed by a wide turn back to a simple cross pole. I had found this difficult in the past as Fizz tended to run out at the last element. This was particularly difficult to control at the canter. The first thing I noticed was that although I could feel Fizz wavering, I was able to give a strong feeling of impulsion without keeping too tight a rein (riding to the bit?). Later in the lesson we were coming up to the cross pole and without thinking, I tucked into the jump position. Before we landed, I thought that I had been in the tuck quite a long time and that I had gone into it a bit early. Tess, the instructor, actually said well ridden, so I asked why. She said that Fizz went for a long one and I had reacted to her movement rather than imposing my own idea of timing.
The same principle that I had been teaching in the dojo comes up the very next day in the ménage! Now this is something I like :-D .
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Re: Aikido

Postby Trudi » Sun Feb 02, 2014 8:11 pm

:thumbup: it is an intuitive thing and I'm sure what sets the brilliant show jumpers apart from the good ones is that ability to sense things without having to process it in a mechanical way.
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Re: Aikido

Postby poneysPie » Mon Feb 03, 2014 10:51 am

Alec, I saw this and thought of you......
Thoughts on Naturally Classical meets with Aikido: As the student progresses, the focus on technique can diminish as a greater and deeper power takes over. The mind of the student can focus on feel and empathy. If the technical dimension becomes the major focus, the student will be unable to dig deeper. Yet, with much practise and patience the art form can be created. It is similar to an artist who prefers to create a picture of inspiration rather than a product of say painting by numbers. The art of Aikido encourages the student to view the other person with an open heart and NOT with ego. This entails finding some empathy with their situation, the power they use, their balance emotions. This will not be found by eye contact only or through the intellectual mind but rather through an awareness from the heart. I demonstrate heart-breath awareness and teach this connection from the heart, with my Iberian stallions. The lessons of Aikido will help the rider, to empathise with the horse, observing the energy and emotions they are using. Is the energy borne of fear and flight or joie de vivre and pride. Is the true nature of the horse revealed within his movement? short snippet from article http://www.naturallyclassical.com


Unfortunately the article referred does not appear to be available via the link provided :blink:
“Ask often; be content with little, praise a great deal.” (Nuno Oliveira)
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Re: Aikido

Postby spottygiraffe » Mon Feb 03, 2014 12:47 pm

Late Starter wrote:without thinking, I tucked into the jump position. Before we landed, I thought that I had been in the tuck quite a long time and that I had gone into it a bit early. Tess, the instructor, actually said well ridden, so I asked why. She said that Fizz went for a long one and I had reacted to her movement rather than imposing my own idea of timing.

:thumbup: That's what's so interesting about jumping -so much of it is trusting the horse to solve the problem of how to get over the obstacle and going with it as it happens. I fell off Iz once because I over-rode the approach to a jump and I folded a split second too early, which completely put her off and she refused.
Sarah x

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Re: Aikido

Postby Late Starter » Mon Feb 03, 2014 1:16 pm

What is often overlooked in these articles (pity about thte link) is the amount of study that goes in to getting that level of competence in Aikido. There is no short cut or course that will teach it over a weekend. Much as you cannot learn to ride to an equivalent degree of competence in a weekend. There are some things that transfer well both ways, such as balance, proprioception and relaxation. These may help speed the learning process, but you still have to learn the skills and drills. Then you can get on to the more "instinctive" stuff. I have put some adverts out at the riding school. If I get any students that way, I would be interested to see how well they take to the Aikido.
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Re: Aikido

Postby Candy » Tue Feb 04, 2014 11:08 am

"proprioception"

Thanks. I've been trying to remember that word for days...


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Re: Aikido

Postby Tess and Organza » Fri Feb 07, 2014 4:54 pm

I need to look it up :oops:
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Re: Aikido

Postby Late Starter » Mon Feb 17, 2014 6:19 pm

Pooh. The road to the dojo remains closed to non-residents due to flooding. It looks like I will have to cancel classes this week, just like last week. One of my students is going for first Dan on Saturday as well - down in Somerset. I'll remind him to take his flippers.... :swim:
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Re: Aikido

Postby Late Starter » Mon Feb 24, 2014 1:11 pm

And the boy nailed it on Saturday. My student passed his 1st Dan. The grading officer was quite (but rightly) picky about correct posture and maintaining position in the centre of teh movement. Th ebig positive was that the lad did not try to rip uke's arm off and beat him to death with the soggy end, like he did last time. The last twelve months spent working on calmness and relaxation have not been wasted. By the way Tess, did you manage to look it up?
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Re: Aikido

Postby Chevalblanc » Mon Feb 24, 2014 3:57 pm

Late Starter wrote: the lad did not try to rip uke's arm off and beat him to death with the soggy end?


Is that not allowed then? :wink: :lol:
Helen

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